If You Wanted Privacy, You Should Have Told John to Retire

Can we just all agree on one thing; there are certain professions in this world for which you must trade in your privacy.  That’s just how it goes.  If you’re a twenty year old female who is moderately attractive and you sing or act for a living, the reality of the situation is that you will have pictures taken of you every minute of your waking life.  If you wanted to be rich and famous but wanted your privacy, you should have been a novelist.

By that same token, if you or your spouse are planning on entering politics, just go ahead and get used to forgetting what privacy means.  That’s the way the game is played.  And while I disagree with some of it, there are also very good reasons why public officials have limited opacity when it comes to their personal lives.

Enter Cindy McCain.  She simply refuses to release her tax returns, claiming it’s a privacy issue.  Now, if she was dirt poor, I could buy off on that, and no, this isn’t classism, this is common sense.  If they were dirt poor, there would be little reason to suspect that there was some dirty dealing going on, and/or that John McCain was benefitting from financial deals that weren’t on the up and up.

But she’s not dirt poor, she’s an heiress.  She has her own private jet.  Now, look, my wife and I share everything, we don’t have much to share, but what we do have, it’s OURS.  Okay, there may be two extra sized and super fluffy towels I’m not allowed to touch, and she never delves into my Buffy/Angel/Firefly collection, but outside of that, what’s yours is mine and vice versa.

John McCain does well for himself; his wife is rich to the point of making your brain hurt trying to comprehend actually having that much money.  You don’t get to sit there and say, “Well, we keep our finances separate.”  It doesn’t work. What, do you live in a three story mansion and John sleeps in a condo?

I’m merely asking for information.

But then, the Washington Times piece is oddly timed with another piece that indicated that Cindy McCain was wheeling and dealing with companies doing business with Sudan.  Not long ago McCain criticized China for ignoring Sudan’s gross human rights violations because of the desire for the country’s oil.

I’m not implying that Cindy did wrong; what I’m saying is that if her husband is going to be president (which he won’t be, but let’s dabble in the hypothetical here), than what’s on her tax returns is fair game, and this because it is completely reasonable to assume that McCain benefits from Cindy’s financial affairs.  It doesn’t matter what you file in April, it’s what’s happening throughout the rest of the year that matters.

What’s there to hide?  Are we going to see massive amounts of special interest and lobbyist money getting pumped to Cindy’s bank account?  I mean, really?  If she really wanted the privacy, she would have convinced her husband not to run.

Plain and simple.

One Response to “If You Wanted Privacy, You Should Have Told John to Retire”

  1. Plumb Bob says:

    A fine analysis all around, except for this minor quibble:

    If they were dirt poor, there would be little reason to suspect that there was some dirty dealing going on, and/or that John McCain was benefitting from financial deals that weren’t on the up and up.

    I don’t see that wealth or the lack of it predicts criminal behavior at all. Yes, the wealth creates opportunities for investment that the poor can’t use, so the wealthy are more likely to have investments that we can check for conflicts of interst; but that’s not to say that the wealth increases the likelihood of “dirty dealing.”

    The prejudices of the 19th century held that the poor were more likely to commit crimes, which offends our modern, egalitarian sensibilities. I haven’t figured out yet why a prejudice holding that the rich are more likely to commit crimes does not offend those same, egalitarian sensibilities… unless we’re actually just hiding Marxist dialectics behind a scrim of egalitarianism.

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