Three for Obama

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch endorses Obama for president. And the Toledo Blade. And the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

Here is a passage from the Post-Dispatch‘s endorsement — an article-length piece:

Over the past nine months, Mr. Obama, the junior senator from Illinois, has emerged as the only truly transformative candidate in the race. In the crucible that is a presidential campaign, his intellect, his temperament and equanimity under pressure consistently have been impressive. He has surrounded himself with smart, capable advisers who have helped him refine thorough, nuanced policy positions.

In a word, Mr. Obama has been presidential.

Meanwhile, Mr. McCain, the senior senator from Arizona, became the incredible shrinking man. He shrank from his principled stands in favor of a humane immigration policy. He shrank from his universal condemnation of torture and his condemnation of the politics of smear.

He even shrank from his own campaign slogan, “Country First,” by  selecting the least qualified running mate since the Swedenborgian shipbuilder Arthur Sewall ran as William Jennings Bryan’s No. 2 in 1896.

In making political endorsements, this editorial page is guided first by the principles espoused by Joseph Pulitzer in The Post-Dispatch Platform printed daily at the top of this page. Then we consider questions of character, life experience and intellect, as well as specific policy and issue positions. Each member of the editorial board weighs in.

On all counts, the consensus was clear: Barack Obama of Illinois should be the next president of the United States.
[…]
John McCain has served his country well, but in the end, he may have wanted the presidency a little too much, so much that he has sacrificed some of the principles that made him a heroic figure in war and in peace. In every way possible, he has earned the right to retire.

Finally, only at this late point do we note that Barack Obama is an African-American. Because of who he is and how he has run his campaign, that fact has become almost incidental to most Americans. Instead, his countrymen are weighing his talents, his values and his beliefs, judging him not by the color of his skin, but the content of his character.

That says something profound and good — about him as a candidate and about us as a nation.

The Blade::

During the campaign, Senator Obama also has shown himself to possess steely self-control, a single-minded focus, and endearing good humor in the face of specious attacks on everything from his biracial origin to his boyhood upbringing to his acquaintances during his political career in rough-and-tumble Chicago. His calm and deliberate demeanor is particularly important because steadiness at the helm of government will be necessary to extricate the United States from its current crisis of confidence, both in politics and economics.

We have to ask ourselves: Which candidate will be better able to inspire the American people? Which will do a better job of casting off the politics of personal destruction and appealing to our better natures, calling us to service, encouraging needed sacrifices, and developing the new approaches necessary for the 21st century? Which will see the current troubles as an opportunity to shape a better future?
[…]
America needs a new direction, not just because the current administration’s economic policies – not to mention its war-bound foreign policies – have contributed to our current problems, but because we have lost our way in terms of the proper relationship between government and the people and, more importantly, the responsibility we owe each other. Americans who view the future with optimism do not – even in the face of terrorism – give up the basic freedoms our revolutionary forefathers died to secure.

Sen. John McCain, by nature, has shown himself to be incapable of providing the American people with an optimistic vision of the future. Firmly rooted in the failed politics and policies of the past, he cannot guide us on a path he does not see.

Senator Obama already has demonstrated that he is a man of the future in the way he has inspired a new generation of voters to become involved in the political process and to actively strive for a better tomorrow.

The Post-Gazette:

Despite the recent nastiness of his campaign. Sen. McCain is essentially a good man, but he is yesterday’s man. His campaign takes its core text from the “Wizard of Oz”: Don’t mind the man behind the curtain. That man is George Bush, the failed magician who cannot be spoken of lest the American people be reminded of what he has wrought and what party he belongs to.

To make their trick work, Mr. McCain and his running mate, Gov. Palin, trade heavily on being mavericks — too heavily to be believed.
[…]
That the argument about issues has been essentially won by Sen. Obama is plain from the scurrilous attacks now being launched against his character — increasingly by Ms. Palin — alleging guilt by association, unpatriotic behavior and worse.

This closing blizzard of slime is another attempt to spread the wizard’s curtain further: Don’t look at how the economy has impoverished you while a Republican has been in the White House, look at Mr. Obama’s passing acquaintance with an old radical who did bad deeds almost 40 years ago, because that is more important.

Yes, they apparently do think the American people are that stupid.

UPDATE: The National Review‘s former publisher, Wick Allison, has endorsed Obama. Joe Gandelman has the details.

One Response to “Three for Obama”

  1. DrGail says:

    Gee, whaddya know? I actually am heartened by something published in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. (Something that I never recall having occurred when I lived in St. Louis.)

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